How do I get a vaccine appointment or walk-in site near me?

My Turn

Check myturn.ca.gov or call (833) 422-4255 to get a COVID-19 vaccine appointment or walk-in site near you.

VaccineFinder

Use the CDC’s VaccineFinder to find an appointment or walk-in site near you.

You can also check with your healthcare provider or local pharmacy.

Get vaccinated – it’s safe, effective, and free. Vaccination is the most important tool to end the COVID-19 pandemic. Every Californian 12 and up is now eligible for vaccination.

On this page:


Vaccinations for kids 12-15

Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine is authorized by the FDA for those aged 12-15. It was found to be safe and effective in protecting children as young as 12 in clinical trials.

This broader authorization of this COVID-19 vaccine for younger people will help California build on our huge success vaccinating the majority of the population 16 and up. The COVID-19 vaccine is free for all Californians, regardless of insurance and immigration status. You will not be asked about your immigration status when you receive the vaccine.

California’s vaccine incentive program

Vax for the Win

How to get vaccinated

Schedule with My Turn

Every Californian can sign up at myturn.ca.gov or call (833) 422‑4255 to get their COVID-19 vaccine appointment or find walk-in sites near them.

Schedule with a local provider

You can use the CDC’s VaccineFinder tool to find vaccination locations near you.

You should also check with your healthcare provider. They can advise if you can get your vaccination with them, or in another setting.

Illustration of a women getting tape on vaccination site

Vaccines are highly effective against severe COVID-19. No fully-vaccinated person died due to COVID-19 during clinical trials of the three authorized vaccines.


How vaccines work

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus. That means it is possible a person could still get COVID-19 just after vaccination, because the vaccine has not had enough time to build immunity. 


What to expect after vaccination

You may have mild side effects

After COVID-19 vaccination, you may have some side effects. These are normal signs that your body is building immunity. Your arm may hurt where you got your shot or you may have redness or swelling. You may be tired or have a headache, muscle pain, chills, fever, or nausea.  They may affect your ability to do daily activities, but should go away in a few days. Some people have no side effects. Learn more about Possible Side Effects After Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine.

The CDC recommends women younger than 50 years old to be aware of the rare risk of blood clots with low platelets after taking Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 Vaccine, and that other COVID-19 vaccines are available where this risk has not been seen. Read CDPH’s Fact Sheet: Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Benefits and Risks.

If you have experienced a side effect after COVID-19 vaccination, you can report it to:

  • VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System)
  • V-safe (After Vaccination Health Checker)

When to call the doctor

In most cases, discomfort from pain or fever is a normal sign that your body is building protection. Contact your doctor or healthcare provider:

  • If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot gets worse after 24 hours
  • If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days

If you get a COVID-19 vaccine and you think you might be having a severe allergic reaction after leaving the vaccination site, seek immediate medical care by calling 911. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines and rare severe allergic reactions.

What you can start to do

If you’ve been fully vaccinated, you can resume most activities that you did prior to the pandemic

Read more at the CDC’s When You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated.

What we know

  • COVID-19 vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19 disease, especially severe illness and death.
  • COVID-19 vaccines reduce the risk of people spreading COVID-19.

What we’re still learning

  • How effective the vaccines are against variants of the virus that causes COVID-19. Early data show the vaccines may work against some variants but could be less effective against others.
  • How well the vaccines protect people with weakened immune systems, including people who take immunosuppressive medications.
  • How long COVID-19 vaccines can protect people.

Get a digital copy of your vaccine record 

You can now access a digital copy of your vaccination record, known as the Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record. It’s available to you if you got vaccinated in California and your information is updated in the state’s immunization systems. 

This digital copy can be used as proof of vaccination. 

See Frequently Asked Questions to learn more about your digital vaccine record.

If you have trouble

If you were not able to get your digital vaccination record, you may need to correct or update some information. Follow the troubleshooting tips at cdph.ca.gov/covidvaccinerecord.

What might prevent you from getting your COVID-19 vaccination record:

  • The site you received your vaccination from does not report to the state’s immunization systems, or didn’t report your vaccination
  • The information you entered doesn’t match your record in the registry

If the record you received is inaccurate or incomplete, please update your information through the Troubleshooting Form.

Read CDPH’s Vaccine Record Guidelines & Standards for more information.


Vaccine equity for hardest-hit communities

The Governor announced seven equity strategies in California’s vaccine rollout to protect hard-to-reach communities, address vaccine questions, and drive innovative efforts in communities hardest hit by the pandemic.

Vaccination progress data

Spread the news about the vaccines

Vaccinate ALL 58 is our state’s COVID-19 vaccination program for Californians in all 58 counties.

Share that vaccination against COVID-19 is here. Visit the COVID-19 Response Toolkit page to find images and videos you can post on social media.

Map of California with text Vaccinate ALL 58 - Together we can end the pandemic.

Questions and answers

Vaccination for children

Do providers need parental consent before administering  a COVID-19 vaccine to a minor?    

Yes. Vaccine providers must obtain consent from a parent, legal guardian, or other adult having legal custody before vaccinating a minor. But there are some exceptions:  

  • Emancipated minors do not need the consent of a parent or guardian to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Providers may accept written consent from a parent or legal guardian of an unaccompanied minor. The written consent must verify the parent/guardian has been provided the Pfizer EUA Fact Sheet.
  • Phone or video consent is possible if the parent/guardian confirms that they have been provided the Pfizer EUA Fact Sheet or the Fact Sheet is read to the parent/guardian.

Families should check with their vaccine provider on acceptable forms of consent. See CDPH’s Pfizer Vaccine Minor Consent Guidance for more details.

Why should I vaccinate my child?

Cases in children are increasing. The American Academy of Pediatrics reports that youth now account for 22% of new COVID-19 cases in the U.S. This time last year it was only around 3%. It is important to get young people vaccinated to prevent new cases from increasing further.

The more vaccinations, the more we stop the spread of highly contagious coronavirus variants and shrink the pool of people vulnerable to COVID-19. By getting our 12- to 15-year-olds vaccinated, families can be safer as we get back to doing the things we love.

My child has had reactions to other vaccines – should they still get the vaccine?

Yes, unless they have had anaphylactic type reactions to components of the Pfizer vaccine. Allergic reactions to the COVID-19 vaccine are rare and very few people have had severe adverse reactions. If your child has allergic reactions to the flu vaccine or other severe allergies, you should report that to their health providers in advance of receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. The COVID-19 vaccine is safe, effective, and important to receive in order to overcome this pandemic.   

Is there an increased vaccination risk to children who have pre-existing conditions like asthma?

Youth aged 12 to 15 can still receive the COVID-19 vaccine even if they have underlying health conditions. If you have specific questions about a condition, please talk to your healthcare provider, local community clinic, or public health office.

Will my child be required to get vaccinated before returning to in-person schooling, especially in the fall?

While vaccination isn’t currently required to return to in-person learning, the state’s objective is to get as many of our 2.1 million 12 to 15-year-olds vaccinated prior to the new fall term. By getting our young people vaccinated soon, we can take comfort in knowing those over age 12 are protected against highly contagious coronavirus variants and COVID-19, both inside and outside of the classroom.

Why is the vaccine only for adolescents 12 and over? When do you expect vaccines to be available for younger children?

Vaccine trials and approvals commonly begin with older, more vulnerable populations then extend to younger ages. Adolescents were the next group to be prioritized because they are most similar to adults and are more likely than younger kids to spread the virus and become seriously ill. This approach balances the need for safety and speed, while protecting our children throughout vaccine development.

Both Pfizer and Moderna have ongoing clinical trials in people younger than 12. Depending on the outcome of those trials, authorization for this next age group could happen later this year. Johnson & Johnson is currently in clinical trials for the 12-17 age group.

Vaccines allocation and distribution

I’m an employer and want to help my employees get vaccinated. How do I do that?

The Employer Vaccination Toolkit provides all the information you need to:

  • Partner with local providers for offsite vaccination events
  • Request a worksite mobile clinic
  • Help employees find and book vaccination appointments
  • Share and promote resources that support employees in getting vaccinated

Getting vaccinated

How many COVID-19 vaccine doses are needed? Can I get my second vaccine shot at a different interval than recommended? Can I mix and match COVID-19 vaccines from different manufacturers?

Ideally, you’d get:

  • Two doses for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, 21 days apart
  • Two doses for the Moderna vaccine, 28 days apart 

The Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine only requires one dose.

If two shots are required, get your second shot as close to the recommended interval as possible, but not sooner. However, if you can’t get it at the recommended interval, second doses may be given up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose. There is limited data on how well these vaccines work beyond this window. But if the second dose is given after 42 days, there is no need to start over.

You can’t mix and match different vaccines. Be sure to get the same vaccine the second time that you got the first time. COVID-19 vaccines are not interchangeable with each other. The safety and efficacy of mixing vaccines has not been tested.

How much will the COVID-19 vaccine cost? 

Nothing. COVID-19 vaccines, including their administration, are free to the public.

Read more at the Department of Managed Health Care’s Know Your Health Care Rights.

Do I need to be a California resident to get COVID-19 vaccine?

No. Vaccine distribution is based on eligibility irrespective of residency or immigration status.

How do I cancel or reschedule my vaccine appointment through My Turn?

If you need to cancel or reschedule your appointment, you can do so on your phone or computer, using the SMS or email appointment confirmation notification you received after booking.

On your phone, click the “QR Code link” in your SMS appointment confirmation. This will take you to a web page that contains your QR code and a link to the “Manage your appointments” page.

On your computer, click the “Manage your appointment(s) here” link in the email appointment confirmation you received from My Turn. The “Manage your appointments” page will open and you will be asked to confirm your appointment with your appointment confirmation number and either your cell phone number or your email address.

After confirming, you will have the choice to cancel or reschedule your appointment(s). If you choose to reschedule both your first and second dose Moderna or Pfizer appointment(s), or your single-dose Johnson & Johnson appointment, you will have the choice to change the clinic, appointment time, and/or appointment date. If you want to reschedule your second dose only without changing your first dose, you will only be able to change the second dose appointment time.

Once you have made your changes and click “Continue,” you will receive a new confirmation email and or text message. Your original appointment will not be changed unless you click “Continue.”

I’ve already had COVID-19. Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes. We do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19.

Can I get vaccinated against COVID-19 while I am currently sick with COVID-19?

No. People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for ending isolation. Those without symptoms should also wait until they meet the criteria before getting vaccinated. This guidance also applies to people who get COVID-19 before getting their second dose of vaccine.

Will COVID-19 vaccine sites be accessible?

Yes. All vaccine clinics in California are required to ensure sites and services are accessible in accordance with ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) requirements.

How do I get a COVID-19 vaccine at home, if I am unable to travel to a vaccine site?

Check with your healthcare provider, local health department, or local pharmacy.

If you cannot leave your home to get vaccinated, you can indicate this on myturn.ca.gov or when calling the state’s COVID-19 hotline at (833) 422‑4255. If eligible, you will be connected with your local health jurisdiction to arrange for in-home vaccination services.

How do I get transportation to a vaccine site?

If you do not have a way to get to a vaccination site, you can receive free transportation through myturn.ca.gov or by calling the state’s COVID-19 hotline at (833) 422-4255.

Transportation options include automobile transportation for ambulatory patients and non-emergency medical transportation for non-ambulatory patients, including wheelchair vans, gurney transportation, and other options. Medi-Cal managed care and fee-for-service beneficiaries will be connected with their health plan or service provider to get transportation through existing health benefits.

You can also check with your healthcare provider, local health department, or local pharmacy. 

If you receive Medi-Cal through a managed care plan, contact your plan’s member service department to request assistance for transportation to receive covered benefits. If you receive Medi-Cal through Fee-for-Service (FFS), you can access a list of Non-Medical Transportation (NMT) providers in your county and you can contact them directly to arrange transportation to your appointments. 

If there is not a provider in your area, the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) can assist if you email them at DHCSNMT@dhcs.ca.gov. Please do NOT include personal information in your first email. DHCS staff will reply with a secure email asking for your information about the appointment. 

If you have a need for Non-Emergency Medical Transportation, please inform your medical provider who can prescribe this service and put you in touch with a transportation provider to coordinate your ride to and from your appointment(s).

What to expect after vaccination

What is acceptable as proof of full vaccination?

The following are accepted: 

  • Original DHHS CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card (which includes name of person vaccinated, date of birth, type of vaccine provided, lot number, date last dose administered, and site where administered)
  • A photo or paper copy of your DHHS CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card
  • A photo of your DHHS CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card stored on a phone or other electronic device
  • Paper or digital documentation of vaccination from a healthcare provider or other issuer.
  • A digital copy of your vaccination record from the Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record (DCVR). 

Read CDPH’s Vaccine Record Guidelines & Standards for complete details.

What does it mean to be “fully vaccinated”?

People are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19 two weeks after they receive the second dose in a 2-dose series (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna), or two weeks after they have received a single-dose vaccine (Johnson and Johnson/Janssen).

See CDPH’s COVID-19 Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People for complete details.

Will the COVID-19 vaccine make me test positive for COVID-19?

No. A vaccine will not cause you to test positive on viral tests.

If your body develops an immune response (the goal of vaccination), there is a possibility that you may test positive on antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate that you may have protection against the virus.

How is my privacy protected if I take the COVID-19 vaccine?

California law strictly limits how personal information about those who are vaccinated can be shared. California negotiated with the federal government to limit the required data sharing to only information that will not allow an individual to be identified.

Read more at CDPH’s California Data Use Agreement and Frequently Asked Questions.

Should I keep my COVID-19 vaccination record card?

Yes. We urge Californians to keep their vaccination record cards for themselves and their families in a safe place to prevent loss or damage.

The Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record (DCVR) portal gives you a digital copy of your vaccine record. If you’ve lost your paper vaccine card, you may print out your digital record and use it at any place where you would show your paper vaccination card.

Read CDPH’s Vaccine Record Guidelines & Standards for complete details.

Vaccine limitations

If I get a COVID-19 vaccine, will I still need a flu shot this fall?

Yes. COVID-19 vaccine does not provide protection against flu.

Are there certain populations who should not get a COVID-19 vaccine? What about people with allergies?

The CDC recommends that:

  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get either of the currently available mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna).
  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction or an immediate allergic reaction to any ingredient in Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get the J&J/Janssen vaccine.
  • If you had an immediate allergic reaction after getting the first dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get the second dose.  
  • If you are allergic to PEG, you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. Ask your doctor if you can get the Janssen vaccine.
  • If you are allergic to polysorbate, you should not get the Janssen vaccine. Ask your doctor if you can get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.
  • If you aren’t able to get one type of COVID-19 vaccine because you are allergic to an ingredient, ask your doctor if you should get a different vaccine. 
  • If you aren’t able to get the second shot of an mRNA vaccine because you had an allergic reaction, ask your doctor if you should get a different vaccine.

People with underlying medical conditions can receive the FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines provided they have not had an immediate or severe allergic reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine or to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Learn more about vaccination considerations for people with underlying medical conditions. Vaccination is an important consideration for adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions because they are at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19.

To learn about the ingredients in authorized COVID-19 vaccines, see

If I’m pregnant or breastfeeding, should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that pregnant and lactating individuals can receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Experts have not identified any safety concerns for pregnant or lactating people who were vaccinated or their breastfeeding babies. The COVID-19 vaccines do not contain the live virus, so they cannot cause COVID-19.

Pregnant people are more likely to get severely ill with COVID-19 compared with non-pregnant people. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy can protect you from severe illness if you get COVID-19. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. 

For more information, read:

How long should I wait to get the vaccine after I’ve had COVID-19?

The CDC recommends:

  • If you tested positive, had only mild symptoms, and were not treated for the coronavirus, you should wait at least 10 days after the start of COVID-19 symptoms and satisfy criteria to discontinue isolation before getting the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Wait 90 days to get the vaccine if you recovered from a COVID-19 infection and were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma.

Can I get a COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as another vaccine?

Yes, you can get a COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines at the same visit. You no longer need to wait 14 days between different vaccinations. Experience has shown that the way our bodies develop protection after getting vaccinated (immune response) and the level of side effects are generally the same when given alone or with other vaccines. Learn more about getting more than one kind of vaccine.

Vaccine choices

Will I have a choice between the various COVID-19 vaccines?

Yes. VaccineFinder allows you the option to search for vaccines by manufacturer.

Are the COVID-19 vaccines mandatory? 

No, there is no mandatory vaccination requirement from either the state or federal government. Once more and more Californians see how safe and effective the COVID-19 vaccines are, we hope they will voluntarily opt to receive them.

May an employer require COVID-19 vaccination for all employees entering the workplace?

Yes, if certain requirements are met. Under the ADA, an employer may require all employees to meet a qualification standard that is job-related and consistent with business necessity, such as a safety-related standard requiring COVID-19 vaccination. However, if a particular employee cannot meet such a safety-related qualification standard because of a disability, the employer may not require compliance for that employee unless the employer can demonstrate that the individual would pose a “direct threat” to the health or safety of the employee or others in the workplace.  

Read What You Should Know About COVID-19 and the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and Other EEO Laws for complete details.

How can I convince my family and friends to take a COVID-19 vaccine?

Talking with family and friends about the benefits of getting a COVID-19 vaccine can be hard. You can help by listening without judgement and identifying the root of their concerns. Things to remember to help open the discussion include:

  • Listen to questions with empathy
  • Ask open-ended questions to explore concerns
  • Ask permission to share information
  • Help them find their own reason to get vaccinated
  • Help make their vaccination happen

The CDC has recommendations on how to talk about COVID-19 vaccines with friends and family.


Stay informed

All Californians—regardless of where they live, their working environment, their social supports, or how they identify⁠—deserve a healthy life.

On this page you’ll find: 

How California is addressing health inequity

COVID-19 has highlighted existing inequities in health. Many of these inequities are the result of structural racism. One form this takes is the unequal distribution of and access to health care resources.

Committed to a California for All, the state is identifying communities most impacted and directing resources to address COVID-19 health inequities. Reducing COVID-19 risk in all communities is good for everyone, and California is committed to making it part of our reopening plan.

State public health leaders cannot address COVID-19 health inequities alone. A healthy California for everyone requires partnership with the private sector, local government, and community partners at all levels.

The disparities in our diverse communities are severe

COVID-19 disproportionately affects California’s low income, Latino, Black, and Pacific Islander communities, as well as essential workers such as those in health care, grocery, and cleaning services.

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Cases per 100K people:

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Note: This data is cumulative since the first COVID-19 case was reported in January 2020. Case rate is defined as cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100K population. Death rate is defined as cumulative COVID-19 deaths per 100K.

Reopening equitably

California took action to ensure equitable distribution of the vaccine. For example, we partnered with mobile clinics in local school districts and places of worship. We also provided free transportation to vaccine sites. We’re still working to provide access to vaccines in our hardest-hit communities.

See how communities are impacted in your county

COVID-19 impact by race and ethnicity

Latino, Black, and Pacific Islander communities have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. We have made some strides in addressing disparities within these communities, but we must do better.

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COVID-19 health equity metric

The health equity metric measures the positivity rate in the most disproportionately-impacted communities. These communities are identified in the Healthy Places Index, developed by the Public Health Alliance of Southern California, as census tracts that have less healthy community conditions such as low median income, education completeness, and health care access. The Blueprint for a Safer Economy ensures that counties address COVID-19 in all communities. To open further, the health equity metric cannot significantly fall behind overall county positivity rates. Read more about the the plan for reopening that includes the health equity metric.

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  • The health equity metric is not applied to counties with a population less than 106,000.
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Data completeness is critical to addressing inequity

We know a lot about the impact of COVID-19 on certain communities, but we can better invest our resources by increasing the collection of race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation and gender identity data. This data collection requires close cooperation with private sector partners, laboratories, and state and county officials. View resources on how to improve reporting.

    • Reporting by race and ethnicity in California
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  • Factors that increase risk of infection and severe illness
  • Californians in crowded housing or transportation, and with less access to paid leave and other worker protections, have a higher risk of infection of COVID-19. Social determinants of health, such as food insecurity, lack of health insurance, and housing instability can increase the risk of poor outcomes. These social determinants of health are often the result of structural racism.
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  • Percentage of community living in crowded housing
  • Percentage of community without health insurance
  • Income
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  • Access to health insurance
  • Note: Data comes from the American Community Survey and is statewide. It does not reflect individual counties. Data shown is a cumulative 7-day total with a 7-day lag, updated on .
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Underlying health conditions

Existing health problems can increase the severity of COVID-19. Examples include heart conditions, obesity, kidney disease, and diabetes, all of which are more common in communities of color.

A history of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) increases risk for chronic health conditions including heart disease, obesity, kidney disease, and diabetes and may increase the risk for severe COVID-19 illness.

  • ACEs are experiences of abuse, neglect, and household challenges occurring by age 18 and are associated with long-term risk for poorer physical, mental, and behavioral health.
  • Exposure to prolonged ACEs, when experienced without protective buffering factors, can lead to changes to the biological stress response which can affect immune functioning (the toxic stress response).
  • Individuals with a history of ACEs may also be more sensitive to the effects of new stressors, such as those presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. See how to manage stress for health.

Find testing near you

State-sponsored testing is searchable at the link below. Testing sites from other providers may be available at your county’s COVID-19 website.

Find a testing location

Free, confidential COVID-19 testing is available to every Californian. Get vaccinated to minimize the need for testing.

On this page:


Testing guidance

As the vaccination rate increases across California, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is adapting testing guidance to focus on high-risk populations and individuals who have not been vaccinated.

Testing provides insights into community prevalence and transmission, letting us monitor the introduction of new variants into the community and the evolution of the virus. 

In general,

  • Fully-vaccinated individuals do not need to undergo diagnostic screening testing in non-healthcare workplace settings.
  • Diagnostic screening testing of asymptomatic employees in acute health care and long-term care facilities should continue regardless of vaccination status, with a few exceptions:
    • Facilities may stop routine testing of asymptomatic staff who are fully vaccinated where:
      • More than 70% of residents and more than 70% staff are fully vaccinated in a long-term care facility, or
      • More than 70% of staff are fully vaccinated in an acute health care facility.
    • Facilities may consider continuing routine testing for fully-vaccinated staff with underlying immunocompromising conditions (like organ transplantation or cancer treatment), which might impact the level of protection provided by COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Diagnostic testing should be considered for all individuals with symptoms or exposure to COVID-19:
    • All individuals with symptoms of COVID-19 should be subject to diagnostic testing immediately.
    • Individuals who have not been fully vaccinated and have close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should be tested.
  • Testing before entry, admission, competition, or travel: Non-vaccinated individuals should be tested if they will be taking part in activities that put them or others at higher risk for COVID-19 exposure. Pre-testing should be considered for those attending large indoor social or mass gatherings (such as large private events, live performance events, sporting events, or theme parks), competing in high risk sports, or other events in crowded or poorly-ventilated settings.

Read CDPH’s Updated Testing Guidance to find out who needs to get tested, when, and how often.


Cost for testing

There are no out-of-pocket costs for COVID-19 testing. A health plan enrollee can get a COVID-19 test when needed by any provider, in or out of their health plan network, at no cost. If you’re uninsured, the government pays for your test.


How to get tested

California has partnered with OptumServe to provide free, confidential testing statewide. Tests are available for everyone, including underserved communities and individuals who are at high risk. 

Testing with OptumServe

Tests are by appointment only. Find a location near you and make an appointment at:

Register to be tested for COVID-19

If you do not have internet access, call 1-888-634-1123.

OptumServe community testing sites serve all individuals who qualify for a test. This includes uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and homeless individuals. You do not need a driver’s license to get this test.


Questions and answers

Does my health plan have to cover my COVID-19 test? 

Yes. The federal guidance requires health plans to provide t testing at no cost to everyone (even those without COVID-19 symptoms or possible exposure to COVID-19). You do not need to be an “essential worker” to get a COVID-19 test.

To get tested you can go to any COVID-19 testing provider authorized or licensed by the state, including drive-through testing sites (such as at a pharmacy) and “pop-up” testing sites. You do not need to go to a provider that is in your health plan’s or health insurer’s provider network. You do not need to get permission from your health plan or health insurer before going to get a COVID-19 test. And you do not need to pay a co-payment for a COVID-19 test.

What if I don’t have health insurance and I need COVID-19 testing or care?

For the uninsured, the government pays for all necessary COVID-19 testing and care. Check your symptoms using the Symptom Screener or by talking to your doctor.

Is there an over-the-counter COVID-19 test I can take at home?

Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued several Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) for  over-the-counter (OTC) fully at-home diagnostic tests for COVID-19. The tests are authorized for individuals with or without symptoms. You can buy these tests in drug stores and similar retailers.

Individuals with positive results should:

Individuals who test negative and experience COVID-like symptoms should follow up with their health care provider. It is possible to get a negative test result and still be infected with coronavirus.

For more information, see the following FDA news releases:

Is there a prescription COVID-19 test I can take at home?

Yes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for an at-home COVID-19 diagnostic self-test. The authorization is for home use with self-collected nasal swab samples in individuals aged 14 and older. This test is currently authorized for prescription use only. 

The test works by swirling the self-collected sample swab in a vial that is then placed in the test unit. In 30 minutes or less, the results can be read directly from the test unit’s light-up display. 

Individuals with positive results should:

Individuals who test negative and experience COVID-like symptoms should follow up with their health care provider. It is possible to get a negative test result and still be infected with coronavirus.

For more information, see the FDA news release.

How long does it take for coronavirus test results to come back?

Turnaround time for coronavirus test results is usually less than two days. Approximately two-thirds are returned within a day and more than 85% are available within two days.

This turnaround time includes shipping time. So for labs that process home testing kits, turnaround time may depend on when an individual mails back their kit.

If you haven’t received your test results and it’s been several days, contact your healthcare provider, testing service, or local health department.

Read more at California’s COVID-19 Testing Task Force.

What is acceptable as proof of a negative COVID-19 test result?

The following are accepted:

  • Printed document from your test provider or laboratory
  • An email or text message displayed on your phone from your test provider or laboratory

The information provided should include name of person tested, type of test performed, and date of negative test result. For PCR, the date of negative result must be within the prior 72 hours; for antigen, the date of negative result must be within the prior 24 hours.

When can I be around other people after I tested positive for COVID-19 but had no symptoms?

If you continue to have no symptoms, you can be with others after 10 days have passed since your test.

The CDC has detailed recommendations for people who test positive but have no symptoms.

If I test positive for COVID-19 in a viral test, what should I do to protect others in my household?

You should self-isolate from others in your household who have not tested positive. Sleep and stay in a separate room from them, and use a separate bathroom, if possible. Multiple infected people in the same household can use the same room for isolation.

Members of your household should get tested right away. They should quarantine for at least 14 days: 

  • Close contacts who have never had any symptoms may discontinue quarantine after Day 10 from the date of last exposure without testing.
  • If you are released from quarantine before Day 14 after exposure, you must:
    • Monitor yourself daily for COVID-19 symptoms through Day 14 and if symptoms occur, immediately self-isolate and contact your local public health department or healthcare provider to get tested.
    • Wear a mask or facial covering around others, continue to wash your hands frequently, and stay at least 6 feet from others through Day 14.

You do not have to quarantine if:

  • You recovered from COVID-19 within the past 3 months and have no new symptoms.
  • You are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and show no symptoms.

Stay informed

If you are an older adult or care for one, here are safe and reliable options for getting help with:

Great Plates – food delivery

California’s older adults can get three free, restaurant-quality meals through Great Plates Delivered. This home delivery program helps seniors stay safe at home during the pandemic. It is currently authorized through July 9, 2021.

See if you qualify 

You may qualify to get meals from Great Plates if you:

  • Are age 65 or older, are 60-64 and have been diagnosed with or exposed to COVID-19, or are considered high risk by the CDC
  • Live by yourself or with one other program-eligible adult
  • Are not currently receiving assistance from other state or federal nutrition assistance programs, like CalFresh/SNAP or Meals on Wheels
  • Have difficulty accessing food or preparing your own meals
  • Earn 600% or less of the federal poverty limit
  • Live within a county or city participating in the program 

Sign up for delivery

Contact a Great Plates administrator in your city or county and ask about free home delivered meals for seniors.

More details about receiving meals are available in the participant FAQ.

How to provide meals

If you’d like to supply meals or help administer the Great Plates program, review this information and submit your request.

After reading, you can request to volunteer or provide meals.

Other meal delivery options

Living in senior facilities

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities continue to be severely affected by outbreaks of coronavirus. Rules on visits to residents help reduce the disease’s impact on residents and staff. 

Read what you can do to protect and connect with your loved ones in senior living.

State guidance for senior living

Keeping residents safe

Report abuse

COVID-19 statistics

Facility information

To find out what steps a senior living facility is taking to protect residents and staff, contact them or check their website. 

Find details about specific facilities through Nursing Home Compare, provided by Medicare.gov.

See and file complaints about a facility through CDSS’s Care Facility Search.

More services

Thanks to your trust in the vaccine and falling transmission rates, California has fully reopened its economy. This means no more physical distancing, no capacity limits, no county tiers, and relaxed mask guidance.

On this page:


Reopening California 

California is moving Beyond the Blueprint to safely and fully reopen the economy. 

As of June 15, 2021, the Governor terminated the executive orders that put into place the Stay Home Order and the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. He also phased out the vast majority of executive actions put in place since March 2020 as part of the pandemic response, leaving a subset of provisions that facilitate the ongoing recovery.

The new public health order effective June 15 supersedes all prior health orders. The order has limited restrictions, only related to masking and mega-events, as well as settings serving children and youth pending an expected update to the K-12 schools guidance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Restrictions that ended on June 15 include:

  • Physical distancing
  • Capacity limits on businesses
  • County tier system

Read the Governor’s orders: N-07-21 and N-08-21. Find details in the California Department of Public Health’s Beyond the Blueprint for Industry and Business Sectors and the Questions & Answers.


Continuing safety measures

Everyday life will feel a lot like before COVID-19. But reopening safely means continuing vaccinations and protecting the health and well-being of Californians.

Do’s and don’ts for daily life

Restaurants, shopping malls, movie theaters, and most everyday places will be open as normal with no capacity limits or social distancing required. Protect yourself and others by keeping these common-sense rules in mind.

Do

  • Wear a mask if you’re unvaccinated, especially in crowded, indoor spaces
  • Follow safety rules for mega-events
  • Get tested if you’re sick
  • Wear a mask while on public transit, even if you’re vaccinated
  • Honor mask and distancing rules in place at a private business
  • Get tested if required by your workplace
  • Wear a mask when you travel

Don’t

  • Expect others to be ready to shake hands or hug
  • Lose your proof of vaccination
  • Think you can’t get the virus or pass it on because you feel well
  • Assume everyone is vaccinated
  • Expect all COVID-19 rules everywhere to be lifted
  • Travel into the U.S. without proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test
  • Travel if you’re sick

Masks

California’s Department of Public Health has updated statewide masking guidance to match the CDC’s guidance, lifting California’s mask requirements for vaccinated individuals starting on June 15. Vaccinated people are able to come together without masks in most circumstances.

People who are unvaccinated must continue to wear a mask indoors in public settings to protect themselves and others. Also, there are some settings where masking is still required for everyone, such as:

  • Public transit
  • Hospitals
  • Long-term care facilities
  • Homeless shelters
  • Indoors in K-12 schools, childcare, and other youth settings 

See CDPH’s Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings to learn where masks are recommended or may be required.

Travel

California no longer has a travel advisory in effect. There is now no state recommendation to test and quarantine before and after travel.

However, the California Department of Public Health asks that you do the following:

  • Delay travel until you’re fully vaccinated
  • If you’re not fully vaccinated, but choose to travel, get tested before and after
  • No matter your vaccination status, wear a mask while on public transportation or in a transportation hub

Get tested if you feel sick, and avoid traveling if you have or may have COVID-19.

See CDC’s travel guidelines and read more at CDPH’s travel flyer.

K-12 schools, day camps, overnight camps, and childcare

California continues to follow current COVID-19 public health guidance for K-12 schools until further updates from the CDC. For school re-opening information, please visit the  Safe Schools for All Hub.

Day camps and other supervised youth activities must follow these specific portions of the current K-12 schools guidance:

Day camps and other supervised youth activities may post the checklist for day camps and other supervised youth activities in the facility.

The K-12 schools guidance does not apply to youth sports.

Current guidance for childcare programs and providers remains in effect.

The guidance for overnight camps remains in effect through September 2021 unless otherwise indicated by CDPH.

Mega-events

Mega-events are indoor events with 5,000 or more people and outdoor events with 10,000 or more people. This includes events like:

  • Conventions, conferences, and expos
  • Concerts, shows, and nightclubs
  • Sporting events
  • Live events and entertainment
  • Fairs, festivals, and parades
  • Theme parks, amusement parks, and water parks
  • Large private events or gatherings
  • Large races, marathons, and endurance events
  • Car shows

For indoor events with 5,000 or more people, attendees must confirm proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 status in order to attend. 

For outdoor events with 10,000 or more people, it is recommended that attendees confirm proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 status in order to attend. 

All attendees must follow CDPH’s Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings. These public health requirements and recommendations will be reviewed and reevaluated no later than September 1, 2021.

Workplace safety

There are no physical distancing or capacity limits for businesses and activities. Most businesses are required to maintain compliance with California’s COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS), which include current public health guidelines. Certain workplaces, like hospitals and correctional facilities, are required to comply with the Aerosol Transmissible Diseases (ATD) standard instead of the ETS. Find more details in the frequently asked questions about the COVID-19 Prevention ETS.

Visit saferatwork.ca.gov to learn more about COVID-19 workplace requirements.


Retiring the Blueprint map

Under the old Blueprint for a Safer Economy framework, every California county was assigned to a risk-level tier. Based on their positivity rate, adjusted case rate, and/or health equity metric (for counties with populations more than 106,000), counties faced varying degrees of activity and capacity restrictions. The weekly status was shown on a map with four tier colors: purple, red, orange, and yellow.

The Blueprint framework was California’s reality from August 2020 to June 2021, but it is no longer in effect. You can find the latest data about your county on the State Dashboard.

See how tier restrictions were assigned and changed, as well as historical county data at CDPH’s Blueprint Data Archive.

California has collected a wide range of data to inform its response to COVID-19, and developed tools to help process and analyze that data. These are made available to everyone for transparency.

On this page:


Data models

The California COVID-19 Assessment Tool (CalCat) is a model to inform state and local response. You can find nowcasts, forecasts, and scenarios:

https://calcat.covid19.ca.gov


Data dashboards

Statewide case statistics and demographics 

This includes positive cases, deaths, and testing results.

View statewide dashboard

View confirmed case and death data on Open Data Portal

View testing data on Open Data Portal

View probable case data on Open Data Portal

Statewide vaccination statistics and demographics 

This includes an overview of COVID-19 vaccines administered and vaccination progress by group.

View vaccine progress data on Open Data Portal

View vaccine progress data by zip code on Open Data Portal

The impact on hospitals in the state of California 

This includes suspected and positive hospitalized patients by county, including ICU patients.

View hospital dashboard

View hospital data on Open Data Portal

COVID-19 outbreaks 

This dataset contains statewide numbers of COVID-19 outbreaks and associated cases, categorized by setting, reported to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) since January 1, 2021.

View COVID-19 data on Open Data Portal

Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) distribution

Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) distributed by California Governor’s Logistics Task Force. PPE products include N-95 respirators, procedure masks, gowns, face shields and gloves.

View PPE distribution dashboard

The impact on our homeless population

The impact of Project Roomkey and other measures to help homeless Californians. This includes room acquisition, room occupancy, and trailer distribution.

View homeless dashboard

Bed surges

The ability to respond to patients that need beds in facilities such as hospitals, arenas, and other alternative care facilities.

View bed surge dashboard


Databases

The COVID-19 database is available for you in two ways:

  1. Access the database directly in ready-to-query SQL format at

    Snowflake Data Marketplace

    If you are not a Snowflake customer

    sign up for a free trial account today

  2. Access the data through the

    California Open Data Portal


Data dictionaries

The COVID-19 datasets contain the following information. Some of these data dictionaries map back to the data dashboards above.

COVID-19 VACCINE DATA

Verified by the California Department of Public Health.

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
DOSES ADMINISTEREDNumericNumber of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered and reported to the California Immunization Registry (CAIR2), the Healthy Futures Registry, and the San Diego Immunization Registry.Daily
PERCENT DOSES
ADMINISTERED
NumericPercent of total doses administered.Daily
AVERAGE DOSES PER DAY NumericRepresents the average number of vaccine doses reported per day. 7-day rolling average of doses administered 3-10 days prior.Daily
PEOPLE PARTIALLY VACCINATEDNumericNumber of individuals who have received one dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.Daily
PERCENT PEOPLE PARTIALLY
VACCINATED
NumericPercent of population ≥ 12 years of age.Daily
PEOPLE FULLY VACCINATEDNumericNumber of individuals who have received two doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, or one dose of the Janssen vaccine.Daily
PERCENT PEOPLE FULLY
VACCINATED
NumericPercent of population ≥ 12 years of age.Daily
DOSES ON HANDNumericNumber of Doses on
hand.
Daily
DAYS OF
INVENTORY
NumericDays of inventory = Number of Doses on
hand / 7 day Rolling average administered
Daily
DOSES DELIVEREDNumericNumber of COVID-19 vaccine doses delivered. Includes direct federal allocations and federal pharmacy partnership programs but does not include doses delivered to the following federal entities: Indian Health Service, Department of Defense, U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons, and Veterans Affairs. Daily
CDC
PHARMACY DOSES
DELIVERED
NumericNumber of COVID-19 vaccine doses delivered to the CDC Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Facility (LTCF) Program and the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program.Daily
DOSES ADMINISTERED
BY COUNTY OF RESIDENCE
NumericNumber of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered by the county of vaccine recipient’s residence. If the county of residence is not reported, the county where the individual was vaccinated is used.Daily
HPI QUARTILEStringScore based on Healthy Places Index that measures levels of community health, ranging from least healthy community conditions (Quartile 1) to most health community conditions (Quartile 4).Infrequently
VACCINATED_
RACE_
ETHNICITY
StringRace and ethnicity categories of persons vaccinated.  Daily
VACCINATED_
RACE_ ETHNICITY_
PERCENTAGE
FloatPercentage of persons vaccinated within a defined race and ethnicity category. Daily
VACCINATED_
AGE_GROUP
StringAge categories of persons vaccinated. Daily
VACCINATED_
AGE_
PERCENTAGE
FloatPercentage of persons vaccinated within a defined age group.Daily
VACCINATED_
GENDER
StringGender of persons vaccinated. Daily
VACCINATED_
GENDER_
PERCENTAGE
FloatPercentage of persons vaccinated within a defined gender.Daily
MCE/LHJ/LTCFStringJurisdiction of the vaccine providerDaily
TYPEStringType of provider, either Multi-County Entity (MCE), Local Health Jurisdiction (LHJ), Long Term Care Facility Pharmacy Partnership (LTCF)Daily
ORG NAMEStringName of vaccine providerDaily
DOSES ON HANDNumericThis is self-reported daily inventory data into VaccineFinder managed at the federal level by CDC. The data are pulled every day at 6am from Operation Warp Speed TiberiusDaily
LAST REPORT
DATE
NumericDaily

COVID-19 CASES DATA

Verified by the California Department of Public Health.

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
COUNTYStringCounty for which case and death statistics were reported.Daily
TOTAL CONFIRMED CASESNumericCumulative number of laboratory-confirmed positive COVID-19 cases reported by local health departments, since the start of the pandemic.Daily
TOTAL COVID-19 ASSOCIATED DEATHSNumericCumulative number of COVID-19-associated deaths reported by local health departments, since the start of the pandemic. Local health departments use multiple sources to confirm that a death is COVID-associated, including speaking with physicians, reviewing medical records, and consulting with medical examiners. COVID-associated deaths are also counted in “Total Confirmed Cases”.Daily
NEW CASES NumericNumber of new lab-confirmed positive COVID-19 cases reported by local health departments each day.Daily
NEW DEATHS NumericNumber of new COVID-19 associated deaths reported by local health departments each day.Daily
EPISODE DATE NumericThe earliest of the following dates (if the dates exist): date received, date of diagnosis, date of symptom onset, specimen collection date, or date of death.Daily
REPORTED DATE NumericThe date the COVID-19 related event was reported to the California Department of Public Health.Daily
DEATH DATENumericThe date a COVID-19 associated death occurred.Daily

HOSPITALS DATA

Verified by the California Department of Public Health, in partnership with the California Hospitals Association.

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
COUNTYStringThe county where the hospital is located. None of the consolidated reporters had hospitals in different counties.Never
TODAY’S DATE NumericDate for which counts were reported.Daily. 
PREVIOUS DAY’S COVID CONFIRMED  PATIENTSNumericThe number of new patients admitted the previous calendar day to an inpatient bed who have laboratory-confirmed COVID. This field should not include all patients in the hospital the previous day but instead detail COVID counts among new admissions only. This includes all inpatients, and does not include patients in affiliated clinics, outpatient departments, emergency departments and overflow locations awaiting an inpatient bed. Additional clarification added on June 16, 2020.Daily
PREVIOUS DAY’s SUSPECTED COVID PATIENTSNumericThe number of symptomatic patients, with tests for COVID pending laboratory confirmation, admitted the previous calendar day to an inpatient bed. This field should not include all patients in the hospital the previous day but instead detail COVID counts among new admissions only. This includes all inpatients, and does not include patients in affiliated clinics, outpatient departments, emergency departments and overflow locations awaiting an inpatient bed. Patients should be included in this field if they are suspected COVID positive at the time of admission regardless of how their status may have changed by the time data are entered the following day. Additional clarification added on June 16, 2020.Daily
PREVIOUS DAY’S CONVERSION TO COVID CONFIRMEDNumericThe number of total patients in the facility (irrespective of when they were admitted) whose status changed to COVID confirmed positive on the previous calendar day. This will include any individual who, on the previous day, had laboratory results return to confirm a COVID diagnosis where previously their diagnosis was unconfirmed. Added to SmartSheet June 16, 2020.Daily
HOSPITALIZED COVID CONFIRMED PATIENTSNumericThe number of patients hospitalized in an inpatient bed who have laboratory-confirmed COVID. This is not a cumulative number. This includes all inpatients (including those in ICUs and Medical/Surgical units), and does not include patients in affiliated clinics, outpatient departments, emergency departments and overflow locations awaiting an inpatient bed. As of April 21, 2020, COVID ED patients were removed from the Hospitalized COVID count and counted separately, see “ED/Overflow COVID Patients.”Daily
HOSPITALIZED SUSPECTED COVID PATIENTSNumericThe number of patients hospitalized in an inpatient bed without a laboratory-confirmed COVID diagnosis who, in accordance with CDC’s Interim Public Health Guidance for Evaluating Persons Under Investigation (PUIs), have signs and symptoms compatible with COVID (most patients with confirmed COVID have developed fever and/or symptoms of acute respiratory illness, such as cough, shortness of breath or myalgia/fatigue). This includes all inpatients (including those in ICUs and Medical/Surgical units), and does not include patients in affiliated clinics, outpatient departments, emergency departments and overflow locations awaiting an inpatient bed. As of April 21, 2020, Suspected COVID ED patients were removed from the Hospitalized Suspected COVID count and counted separately, see “ED/Overflow COVID Patients.”Daily
HOSPITALIZED COVID PATIENTSNumericThe number of patients currently hospitalized in an inpatient bed who have suspected or confirmed COVID. Added to SmartSheet April 21, 2020.Never – This is a calculated field.
ALL HOSPITAL BEDSNumericThe total number of beds in the facility, including all surge beds, inpatient and outpatient post-surgical beds, labor and delivery unit beds, and observation beds. This includes the total number of beds for which the hospital could provide staff and equipment and is not necessarily reflective of the beds that are staffed at the time the facility reports. This field does not include emergency department (ED) bays. Added to SmartSheet April 21, 2020.Infrequently
ICU COVID CONFIRMED PATIENTSNumericThe number of laboratory-confirmed positive COVID patients that are in the ICU at the hospital. This includes all ICU beds (NICU, PICU, and adult). Additional clarification added on June 16, 2020.Daily
ICU SUSPECTED COVID PATIENTSNumericThe number of symptomatic patients, with tests for COVID pending laboratory confirmation, that are in the ICU at the hospital. This includes all ICU beds (NICU, PICU, and adult). Additional clarification added on June 16, 2020.Daily
ICU AVAILABLE BEDSNumericThe number of ICU beds available at the hospital. This includes all ICU beds (NICU, PICU, and adult). Additional clarification added on June 16, 2020.Never. This is a calculated field.

LOGISTICS DATA

Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) fulfilled by California Office of Emergency Services.

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
COUNTYStringCounty requesting the productDaily
PRODUCT FAMILYStringSummary level category of the productDaily
QUANTITY FILLEDNumericQuantity of product sent to a warehouse/agency for fulfillmentDaily
SHIPPING ZIP/
POSTAL CODE
NumericZip where the facility is located that is receiving the shipped product.Never

LAB TESTING DATA

Current state of test results reported.

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
COUNTYStringCounty for which COVID-19 tests were reported.Daily 
TOTAL COVID-19 MOLECULAR TESTSNumericCumulative number of COVID-19 molecular tests (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests only) performed by laboratories.Daily
NEW COVID-19 MOLECULAR TESTSNumericNumber of new COVID-19 molecular tests (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests only) performed by laboratories each day. Daily
REPORTED DATENumericThe date the COVID-19 test was reported to the California Department of Public Health. Daily
TESTING DATENumericThe earliest date the specimen was collected for testing. Daily
TEST POSITIVITYNumericThe number of positive molecular tests divided by the total number of molecular tests done. Calculation is (7-day sum positive tests) / (7-day sum total tests), by testing date. Prior to March 12, 2021, test positivity was previously reported and calculated as the number of confirmed cases divided by the total number of molecular tests done averaged over a 7 or 14 day period. Daily

CASE DEMOGRAPHICS RACE AND ETHNICITY

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
RACE_ETHNICITYStringRace and ethnicity categories of COVID-19 cases and deaths as reported by local health departments.  Daily
CASE_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19 cases within a defined race and ethnicity category. Daily
DEATH_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19-associated deaths within a defined race and ethnicity category.Daily
PERCENTAGE_CA
_POPULATION
FloatRatio of State population within a defined race and ethnicity category. Daily

CASE DEMOGRAPHICS SEX

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
GENDERStringGender of COVID-19 cases and deaths as reported by local health departments.Daily
CASE_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19 cases within a defined gender.Daily
DEATH_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19 associated deaths within a defined gender.Daily
PERCENTAGE_CA
_POPULATION
FloatRatio of State population within a defined gender category.Daily

CASE DEMOGRAPHICS AGE

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
AGE_GROUPStringAge categories of COVID-19 cases and deaths as reported by local health departments.Daily
CASE_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19 cases within a defined age group.Daily
DEATH_PERCENTAGEFloatPercentage of COVID-19-associated deaths within a defined age group. Daily
PERCENTAGE_CA
_POPULATION
FloatRatio of State population within a defined age group.Daily

COVID-19 OUTBREAKS

Verified by the California Department of Public Health.

COLUMN NAMEFORMATDEFINITIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
JURISDICTIONPlain textJurisdiction where the outbreak occurred
Values include:California
Biweekly
INDUSTRYSECTORPlain textIndustry sector in which the outbreak occurred.

Values include:
Industry Sectors, as classified in the US Census Bureau 2012 Industry Code List. Each industry sector includes a number of individual industries.
Biweekly
INDIVIDUAL SETTINGPlain textIndividual industry in which the outbreak occurred.

Values include:
Individual industries, as classified in the US Census Bureau 2012 Industry Code List.
Biweekly
INDCODENumberCensus industry code for the individual industry in which the outbreak occurred.

Values include:
4-digit individual industry codes, as classified in the US Census Bureau 2012 Industry Code List.
Biweekly
OUTBREAK_TOTALNumberTotal number of confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks reported to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) in the corresponding individual industry
Value:Positive numeric
Biweekly
CASE_TOTALNumberTotal number of associated cases in reported outbreaks in the corresponding individual industry
Value:Positive numeric
Biweekly
OUTBREAK_NEWNumberNumber of new confirmed COVID-19 outbreaks reported in the past 30 days to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) in the corresponding individual industry
Value:Positive numeric
Biweekly
CASE_NEWNumberNumber of associated cases for outbreaks reported in the past 30 days to CDPH in the corresponding individual industry
Value:Positive numeric
Biweekly

HOMELESS IMPACT

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
COUNTYStringCountyDaily
DATEDateReporting dateDaily
ROOMSNumberThe point in time number of hotel/motel rooms a community has secured for individuals experiencing homelessness in need of isolation. These rooms are secured through an occupancy agreement or other type of arrangement with a Hotel/Motel ownerDaily
ROOMS_OCCUPIEDNumberThe point in time number of rooms secured in which a Project Roomkey participant has moved intoDaily
TRAILER_REQUESTEDNumberTotal number of Project Roomkey trailers the community has formally submitted a request for or has been designated to receive
TRAILERS_DELIVEREDNumberThe total number of Project Roomkey trailers the community has received from the state (to be delivered and counted the community must also have necessary trailer supports in place)
DONATED_TRAILERS
_DELIVERED
NumberTotal number of donated Project Roomkey trailers delivered statewide

BED SURGE

VARIABLEFORMATDESCRIPTIONUPDATE FREQUENCY
STATUSStringThe condition of the facilityDaily
TYPE_OF_FACILITYStringThe type of place that will be utilized to support the medical surgeDaily
COUNTYStringCounty the facility resides inDaily
BEDS_READY_TO_ACCEPT
_PATIENTS
NumberNumber of beds assembled and ready for patientsDaily
PATIENTS_IN_BEDSNumberNumber of patients at the facility
TOTAL_BEDSNumberTotal number of beds expected to be ready to accept patients
DATEDateDate reported

Contact info

Email StateInfo@state.ca.gov with any questions about these datasets.


Questions and answers

Is there a dashboard that shows California’s progress in administering COVID-19 vaccine?

Yes. You can find it on our Vaccination progress data page.

Sign up for COVID-19 exposure notifications

Add CA Notify to your phone and get notified if you were near someone with COVID-19.

Find out more
CA Notify logo

Contact tracing is an important tool for slowing the spread of COVID-19.

On this page:


What is contact tracing?

illustration of a contact tracer

Contact tracing is when public health workers identify and notify the people who were exposed to infected people. They let them know that they’ve been in close contact with an infected person, and what to do next to keep themselves and their loved ones safe. Public health departments have used contact tracing for decades to fight the spread of infectious diseases.

How does it work?

Public health workers get in touch with those who have tested positive. They might do this by calling on the phone or sending a short survey by text or email. People who have tested positive may be asked about people they were with who they may have exposed while they were contagious. Public health workers then call or text those close contacts to let them know that they may have been exposed. When they do this, they keep the name of the person who tested positive confidential.

illustration of COVID close contacts

Contact tracers will:

  • Notify you that you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19
  • Ask if you have symptoms and how you’re feeling
  • Recommend you get tested
  • Discuss next steps like testing, quarantine, self-isolation, and medical care

Contact tracing in California

California Connected is our state’s contact tracing program.

California Connected

By helping infected and exposed people self-isolate or self-quarantine, we can slow the spread of the infection and help avoid outbreaks. This helps California support those who are infected or exposed, while also keeping their loved ones and communities safe from the spread of infection. This also helps our hospitals and healthcare systems manage caring for the patients who develop serious illness. Contact tracing is a necessary activity that allows us to safely reopen schools and businesses.

How you can participate

Contact tracing works when you answer the call or text.

All you have to do is answer the phone call or respond to the text message survey sent by your local health department.

Contact tracing is an anonymous way to do your part. The more people answer the call or text, the more lives and jobs California will save and the faster we can re-open schools and businesses and keep them open. Your information is always kept confidential.

illustration of man on phone

Early awareness helps you protect your friends and loved ones from exposure. And early medical care can improve your outcome if you do get sick.

The sooner we can reach you, the sooner you can get advice, testing, and the support you need.


What a contact tracer will ask and offer

You’ll get free, confidential testing and assistance in accessing medical care, regardless of income, health insurance, or immigration status.

If you test positive for COVID-19:

illustration of a test swab
  • You will be asked basic questions like your name and age, the places you’ve been, and the people you’ve spent time with.
  • Those people will be contacted and told they may have been exposed to COVID-19, but your name will not be shared with them.
  • You will never be asked for information about your finances, social security number, or immigration status.
  • You will get advice on how to isolate yourself from others to avoid spreading the disease to loved ones and your community.

If you were exposed to COVID-19:

  • You’ll get a call, text, or email from your local public health department to inform you of this exposure.
  • They will not share information about who may have exposed you. This information is confidential.
  • They will help you understand your risk of getting sick. They’ll tell you what to do immediately to prevent further spread
illustration of a public health worker
illustration of a phone
  • They will stay in touch to see if you develop symptoms.
  • You will get resources to self-quarantine or self-isolate.
  • They may ask questions about the places you’ve been and the people you’ve spent time with.

How your information is kept private

Your identity and health information that you provide to a contact tracer is always kept confidential. It will not be shared with anyone who may have been exposed. 

No one will ask for your

  • Immigration status
  • Social Security number
  • Payment information

California’s strict privacy laws protect all your information. California Connected maintains information with strict privacy and security standards. The information is only collected and stored for use by local and state public health departments.

Read the Privacy Policy at the CDPH Contact Tracing web page.


What to do if you are contacted

Protect yourself and others

If you have COVID-19 or test positive for coronavirus, 

  • Isolate yourself from others, especially those who are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • Try to stay in a separate room and use a separate bathroom.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces or have your caregiver do so.

People you live with are close contacts. They should also self-quarantine and get tested.

You do not have to quarantine or get tested even after close contact, if:

  • You recovered from COVID-19 within the past 3 months and have no new symptoms.
  • You are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and show no symptoms (outside the workplace setting).

Find support

Your local public health department can connect you to 

  • Testing
  • Medical care
  • Housing and other resources, if you need them, to self-isolate or self-quarantine

You will get medical care, regardless of income, health insurance, or immigration status.

Virtual Assistant

The Virtual Assistant is an automated system from California Connected used to support you as part of your local health department’s contact tracing efforts. The Virtual Assistant may ask you to complete a contact tracing survey and can also provide confidential and safe symptom check-ins through text messages. 

You may be contacted by text via the Virtual Assistant. The link to start is sent by a text message from the phone number 233-93. It is safe to click on the link in this text message to start your communications with the Virtual Assistant. You can reply STOP at any time to stop receiving messages. 

Read more at the CDPH Contact Tracing web page.

Support for workers

If you work, your employer may be required to provide you with paid sick leave and other benefits.

If you need childcare, visit MyChildCare.ca.gov to find licensed child care near you. Subsidies may be available. Check your local childcare resource and referral agency to see if you qualify.

If you’re an immigrant, you can find help in the Guide for Immigrant Californians .

Know that you are not alone

Pandemics can be stressful. Fear and anxiety about a new disease and what could happen can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions. 

Coping with stress in a healthy way will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. See this CDC video about managing anxiety and stress.

If you feel like you need to talk to someone for emotional support, see this list of resources. The California Surgeon General released two playbooks for managing stress and tips for caregivers and kids.


Questions and answers

How can I participate in CA Notify, Google and Apple’s exposure notification system?

You can add your phone to the COVID fight by turning on CA Notify, California’s exposure notification system. This system does not track your personal information or location. For details, see the CA Notify website or call 888-421-9457 (888-4C19-HLP).

What is a close contact?

A close contact is someone who was within 6 feet of a person with COVID-19 for at least 15 minutes over a 24-hour period starting from 2 days before symptoms appeared (or, for patients who do not have symptoms, 2 days prior to their test) until the time the patient is isolated.

You are also a close contact if:

  • You provided care at the home of someone who is sick with COVID-19
  • You had direct physical contact with the person (such as hugging or kissing them)
  • You shared eating or drinking utensils
  • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you.

Am I considered a close contact if I was wearing a mask?

Yes, you are still considered a close contact even if you were wearing a mask while you were around someone with COVID-19. Studies suggest masks offer some protection to the wearer, as well as help to protect other people in case you are infected but they are not 100% guaranteed to stop
transmission.

Will contact tracers track my location?

No, California’s contact tracing program does not use any cell phone tracking technology. Laboratories who identify positive cases are required to provide contact information to Public Health. Someone from your local public health department will speak privately with you. All information is confidential and protected by California’s strict privacy laws. They may stay in touch to make sure your symptoms aren’t worsening.

Is contact tracing help available in my language? 

Your local health department can communicate with you in many different languages.

How do I find a coronavirus testing location?

Visit the Testing page. You can search for testing locations there using your zip code. Your local health department website may have additional testing sites listed.

What if I have COVID-19 symptoms and have not been contacted by the health department?

Get tested immediately. Isolate yourself until:

  • at least 10 days have passed since symptoms started, AND
  • your fever has been gone for 24 hours without taking medication, AND
  • your symptoms (like cough and shortness of breath) have improved.

Contact your local health department for contact tracing. This is true whether you’ve tested positive, negative, or are untested.

What if I came in contact with someone who has COVID-19 symptoms, but my local health department is not aware of it?

You should get tested. Contact your local health department for contact tracing. Quarantine yourself while waiting for your test results.

If you tested positive but have no symptoms, you should isolate at home for at least 10 days.

If you develop symptoms, you should stay home until:

  • at least 10 days have passed since symptoms started, AND
  • your fever has been gone for 24 hours without the aid of medication, AND 
  • your symptoms (like cough and shortness of breath) have improved.

This is true whether you’ve tested positive, negative, or are untested.

If you had close contact with someone who tested positive but you tested negative, you should still quarantine at home for at least 10 days.

  • Close contacts who have never had any symptoms may discontinue quarantine after Day 10 from the date of last exposure without testing.
  • If you are released from quarantine before Day 14 after exposure, you must:
    • Monitor yourself daily for COVID-19 symptoms through Day 14 and if symptoms occur, immediately self-isolate and contact your local public health department or healthcare provider to get tested.
    • Wear a mask or facial covering around others, continue to wash your hands frequently, and stay at least 6 feet from others through Day 14.

You do not have to quarantine or get tested even after close contact, if:

  • You recovered from COVID-19 within the past 3 months and have no new symptoms.
  • You are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and show no symptoms.

How is the state supporting schools with contact tracing?

Contact tracing in schools is driven by local policies and conducted in collaboration with each school’s local health department (LHD).  Local public health departments will be the primary point of contact for schools to obtain more information about local contact tracing requirements and resources. 

CDPH is supporting LHDs in their efforts to support their local schools as they reopen through:

  • Training for LHD staff to enhance their school collaborations  
  • Offering redirected state employees trained as school specialists to expand local capacity in triaging school-related requests, data management, and contact tracing help
  • Providing technical assistance and technology to assist LHDs in managing school-affiliated COVID-19 exposures.

A toolkit and webinar series are in development for California school personnel to learn more about contact tracing and keeping their school community safe. The California Safe Schools For All Hub has additional resources and information related to COVID-19 and schools.


Stay informed

In daily life

California has now changed its mask requirements to match the CDC’s guidance:

photo three women wearing masks with caption of wear a mask, stop the spread

  • Unvaccinated people are required to wear masks in indoor public settings and businesses, like:
    • Retail
    • Restaurants
    • Theaters
    • Family entertainment centers
    • Meetings
    • State and local government offices that serve the public

See CDPH’s Face Coverings Q&A to learn more about where masks are still required or recommended.

Read Get the Most out of Masking to learn how a mask can best protect you.

Exemptions to masks requirements

The following individuals are exempt from wearing masks at all times:

  • Persons younger than two years old. Very young children must not wear a mask because of the risk of suffocation.
  • Persons with a medical condition, mental health condition, or disability that prevents wearing a mask. This includes persons with a medical condition for whom wearing a mask could obstruct breathing or who are unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove a mask without assistance.
  • Persons who are hearing impaired, or communicating with a person who is hearing impaired, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication.
  • Persons for whom wearing a mask would create a risk to the person related to their work, as determined by local, state, or federal regulators or workplace safety guidelines.

In the workplace

Cal/OSHA has aligned workplace mask requirements with general mask guidance from the California Department of Public Health.

  • Masks are not required outdoors (except during outbreaks), regardless of vaccination status, though workers should be trained for outdoor use of face coverings.
  • Fully-vaccinated employees do not need to wear masks indoors, but employers must document their vaccination status. 
    • There are some settings where masks are required regardless of vaccination status. In outbreaks, all employees must wear masks indoors and outdoors when six feet of physical distance cannot be maintained, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Employers must provide unvaccinated employees with NIOSH-certified respirator masks for voluntary use when working indoors or in a vehicle with others, upon request.

For more information, see Cal/OSHA’s COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS) and CDPH’s Guidance for the Use of Face Coverings.


Guidance for businesses, venue operators, or hosts 

In settings where masks are still required for unvaccinated individuals, businesses, venue operators, or hosts may choose to:

  • Provide information to all patrons, guests and attendees regarding vaccination requirements and allow vaccinated individuals to self-attest that they are in compliance prior to entry unless otherwise exempt, OR
  • Implement vaccine verification to determine whether individuals are required to wear a mask, OR 
  • Require all patrons to wear masks.

No person can be prevented from wearing a mask as a condition of participation in an activity or entry into a business.

24-hour help

For the Suicide Prevention Lifeline, call 800‑273‑8255 or text 838255

For the Domestic Violence Hotline, 800‑799‑7233 or click Chat Now

Call 911 if you or the person you are helping is in immediate danger.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has changed all of our lives. You may feel anxious, stressed, worried, sad, bored, depressed, lonely or frustrated in these circumstances. You’re not alone.

On this page:

Strategies for managing stress

  • Be mindful of your intake of information from news sources about the virus, and consider taking breaks from it.
  • Maintain social contact with supportive relationships like friends, family or others, by phone, text, or internet.
  • Treat your body kindly: eat healthy foods, avoid excessive alcohol, and exercise as you are able.
  • Call your health care provider if your anxiety interferes with your daily activities.

More stress relief techniques are available in the Roadmap for Resilience and COVID-19 playbook available from the Office of the Surgeon General.

Hotlines if you need to talk to someone 

If you are feeling overwhelmed with sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 800‑273‑8255.

There are additional resources available if you are in crisis:

Youth and teens

Veterans

Veterans Crisis Line: Call800‑273‑8255 and Press 1 or text 838255 for 24/7 support.

First responders and law enforcement

Older Californians 

Deaf and hard of hearing individuals

National Suicide Prevention Deaf and Hard of Hearing Hotline: Access 24/7 video relay service by dialing 800‑273‑8255 (TTY 800‑799‑4889).

Services for substance use disorders

LGBTQ individuals

Find behavioral and mental health services

If you have Medi-Cal and are in need of mental health services, call the number on your health plan membership card, or call your local county mental health line. For help finding what services are covered, call the Medi-Cal Managed Care and Mental Health Office of the Ombudsman at 888‑452‑8609 Monday through Friday from 8am – 5pm.

If you have a health plan through your employer or purchase your own health insurance, and are in need of mental health services, call the number on your health plan membership card.

If you feel like you are coping with your stress by drinking or taking drugs, there is help available from the substance use disorder programs in your county or call the national treatment locator at 800‑662‑HELP.

Older adults can find local services through the Department of Aging’s website, or by calling 800‑510‑2020.

Helplines if you feel unsafe

Partner abuse is never okay and there are people standing by to help, especially during this health crisis. If you can, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800‑799‑SAFE or text LOVEIS to 22522 for 24/7 help in English or Spanish. If you can’t call, visit TheHotline.org to learn how to create a safety plan or get immediate help with the 24/7 “Chat Now” feature.

Call or text the Victims of Crime Resource Center at 800‑VICTIMS line for information on victim services programs in California.

Visit the California Victims Compensation Board website to find information on county victim service providers in California.

There are additional resources available:

Resources to help others

Protecting children from abuse and neglect

Community members play an important role in protecting children from abuse and neglect. If you are worried about the health or safety of a child, call the local CPS hotline for the county where the child lives or find a local child abuse youth victim service provider.

You can call or text the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline 24/7 at 800‑4‑A‑CHILD to speak with a professional crisis counselor who can provide assistance in over 170 languages.

You may also be able to help children and youth who have been abused or neglected by stepping up to serve as a foster caregiver. Please contact your local county’s Social Service or Human Service department, or call the toll-free line at 800‑KIDS‑4‑US.

Family support

If you are concerned about a family in need of food or assistance, or you need resources yourself, call 211, contact your local non-profit Family Resource Center, or apply for public benefits, which may include health care, cash aid, and food and nutrition assistance, through your county’s Social Services or Health and Human Services department.

You can call the California Parent & Youth Helpline at 855‑427‑2736 Monday – Sunday from 8:00am – 8:00pm to get emotional support from a trained Parent Advocate.

NAMI California has resources for family members supporting loved ones with mental health conditions. You can call their HelpLine at 800‑950‑NAMI to get information, resource referrals and support from 7:00am – 3:00pm or email info@namica.org.

Caregivers can find resources at the Department of Aging website, including guidelines to protect the health and safety of both you and your loved one from COVID-19.

County Adult Protective Services

Adult Protective Services: Call 833‑401‑0832 24/7 for concerns about adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Help for renters and landlords

Rental assistance for renters and landlords is available through the California COVID-19 Rent Relief Program. Go to the Housingiskey.com application portal or call 1‑833‑430‑2122 to apply as a renter or landlord.

Apply at Housing Is Key

California is protecting people experiencing homelessness during coronavirus and preventing others from losing their homes.

On this page you will find:

Help for renters, homeowners, and small landlords

The Tenant, Homeowner and Small Landlord Relief and Stabilization Act of 2020 provides renters, homeowners, and small landlords with relief if coronavirus or the quarantine has impacted your ability to pay all or part of your rent or mortgage.

More information is available at Housing is Key

Renters

An executive order protects you from eviction if coronavirus or the quarantine impacted your ability to pay all or part of your rent between March 4, 2020, and August 31, 2020.

The Tenant, Homeowner and Small Landlord Relief and Stabilization Act protects you from eviction if you are unable to pay some or all of your rent due to coronavirus or the quarantine between September 1, 2020, and June 30, 2021. You’ll need to pay at least 25% of your rent for this period. You can do that monthly or in one lump sum by June 30, 2021.

In both situations, you must provide your landlord with a declaration of financial hardship. Make sure you:

  • Explain your financial situation to your landlord and tell them how much you can pay 
  • Save all financial documents 
  • Pay as much of your rent as you can

If your landlord is attempting to evict you and you took all the above steps, contact a local legal aid provider and learn about your protections.

Many utility providers are not shutting off services due to non-payment. Check with the California Public Utilities Commission for more information.

The Water Board restricts the shut off of water during the COVID crisis. Report any water shutoff or reconnect issue at COVID-19 Water Shut-Off Complaint Report.

Homeowners and small landlords

Foreclosure protection is available for homeowners and small landlords who have federally-backed mortgages through the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act. This includes landlords with four or fewer properties (whether or not they’re owner-occupied). 

Homeowners or small landlords who don’t have federally-backed loans can contact their loan servicers to request forbearance. Your lender must provide detailed reasons if they deny your forbearance request. You can contest a denial.

These financial institutions may be able to reduce or delay your monthly payment. In addition, they will:

  • Give you a streamlined process to request forbearance for coronavirus-related reasons, supported with available documentation
  • Confirm approval of and terms of the forbearance program
  • Provide the opportunity to extend your forbearance agreement if you continue to experience hardship due to coronavirus

Learn more about other mortgage protections and resources.

Help for people experiencing homelessness

If you’re experiencing homelessness, you can contact your local homeless continuum of care. In many communities, you can also call 211 for help.

You may be able to get a hotel or motel room through Project Roomkey and the state’s partnership with Motel 6.

Homeless assistance providers

If you’re a homeless assistance provider, determine your community’s need for rooms before you request support from the state. Work with your local continuum of care, emergency management, social services, tribes, and other partners.

California has set aside $150 million in emergency funding to protect the homeless during the coronavirus. Here are some FAQs for homeless assistance providers about those funds.

Temporary housing for essential workers

Housing for the Harvest offers temporary housing to agriculture and food processing workers who need to isolate due to coronavirus infection or exposure. Under this program, the state will pay for hotel rooms for agricultural workers who need to self-isolate. 

Visit housing for agricultural workers to find out program eligibility.

Hotel rooms for healthcare workers 

The Non-Congregate Sheltering (NCS) for California Healthcare Workers Program keeps healthcare workers safe and reduces the spread of the coronavirus. It provides hotel rooms to healthcare workers who give critical care to COVID-19 patients so they don’t bring home the virus to their household. Check the program information to find out about eligibility and how to reserve a room.

Questions and answers

I am homeless and I may have come in contact with coronavirus. How can I self-isolate with nowhere to go and services closing down?

A motel or hotel room may be available for you and your family. Contact your local homeless continuum of care to connect you to this service.

Will there be a rent freeze or waiver for renters? Are evictions allowed during the stay at home order?

The Tenant, Homeowner and Small Landlord Relief and Stabilization Act and an executive order have halted evictions and protected renters. If you are financially affected by  coronavirus and can’t pay your full rent, let your landlord know in writing within seven days of the rent due date. Save documentation as proof. The order does not relieve you from paying rent. It also does not restrict your landlord from collecting rent later.

How do I get mortgage relief and/or forbearance?

Contact and work directly with your mortgage servicer to learn about and apply for available relief. Some financial institutions and their servicers are experiencing a high volume of inquiries.

How long will the mortgage forbearance last?

You’ll agree on the terms of a forbearance with your mortgage service. Financial institutions will confirm approval of and terms of the forbearance program.

Stay informed

Statewide COVID-19 Hotline

833‑422‑4255 (833-4CA-4ALL)

The statewide call center will be open 7 days a week:

  • 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Monday – Friday, Pacific Daylight Time.   
  • Saturday and Sunday  8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Pacific Daylight Time.

This COVID-19 information line is a part of our ongoing effort to provide reliable, trusted information and support.

California COVID Notify Hotline

888‑421‑9457 (888‑4C19‑HLP)

The statewide call center will be open 7 days a week:

8:00 am to 6:00 pm Monday – Sunday, Pacific Daylight Time

California COVID Notify, Google and Apple’s exposure notification system, alerts you if you were in close contact with someone who tests positive for COVID-19 while preserving your privacy.

Local social services information line

Californians can call their local 211 which are available 24 hours a day. 

We urge Californians to do the following:

  1. If you’re looking for general information about state COVID-19 resources: use covid19.ca.gov or call 833‑422‑4255.
  2. If you’re looking for California COVID Notify, Google and Apple’s exposure notification system: visit California COVID Notify or call 888‑421‑9457.
  3. If you’re looking for community services and support: Call 211.
  4. If you’re looking for medicine and medical attention: Call your healthcare provider or pharmacy.

If it’s an emergency: Call 911